Rash from Mexico

If you've come back from your trip to Mexico with a few souvenirs and an odd rash, you're likely wondering what caused the rash. A trip to the doctor is the only way to know for sure,, but there are a few possible causes to your burning (and itching) question you can treat yourself.

Phytophotodermatitis

Medically known as phytophotodermatitis, this rash is often referred to simply as lime disease (note this is not the same as 'Lyme disease'). This rash tends to feel prickly and will occur anywhere on your body that exposed to sunlight. It is caused by combining large amount of citrus, such as limes, with large amounts of sunlight and is common in Mexican tourists who are enjoying plenty of both.

Fortunately, your doctor can give you an ointment to clear your rash from Mexico in a few days with no lasting effects. The best way to avoid this rash is to limit your citrus intake and always wear sunscreen. These safety recommendations are all you need to avoid the discomfort of phytophotodermatitis.

Phytophotodermatitis

Phytophotodermatitis

Miliaria

More commonly known as heat rash, miliaria is a rash from Mexico or anywhere warm. Common in children but possible in anyone, heat rash occurs when tight or heavy clothing prevents air circulation around your body in hot and humid conditions. This lack of air circulation blocks the natural flow of your body's sweat and causes rashes such as prickly heat.

If you suspect heat rash, change your clothes and place a cool compress on the area. When it's time to go out again, rub a small amount of calamine lotion on the area to keep the skin soothed. There is no need for further treatments and the rash will clear on its own. You may even be rid of your redness before you bring home a heat rash from Mexico.

 

Miliaria (Heat Rash)

© summitcheese - Heat Rash

 

Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

If you've recently been to Mexico, you may have been exposed to plants or other materials not found where you live, resulting in an allergic reaction. This type of rash typically appears as small blisters, the fluid inside of which can spread the rash to other people and parts of the body.

For this type of rash, wash the area thoroughly, as well as any clothing that has come in contact with it. Treat the affected area with calamine lotion, hydrocortisone creams and oatmeal baths. Oral antihistamines may also ease any discomfort and can be used in safely in combination with these skin treatments.

Facts about Rashes From Mexico

  • If you bring home a rash from Mexico that looks or feels different than those described here, or if you have reason to believe you may have been exposed to a fungus or virus during your trip, it is important to consult your physician.
  • Some rashes from Mexico are mild and clear on their own but a rash can be a sign of more serious illness.
  • Make sure your doctor knows you've recently traveled so he can more easily determine if your rash is from Mexico or caused by something other than your travels.